Computer laboratory workshops as learning environments for university business statistics: validation of questionnaires

Abstract

Research on learning environments at the higher-education level has been quite sparse compared with studies at other educational levels. Because statistics is perceived as a difficult subject across disciplines, it suffers from low passing rates in many universities. This study involved validating questionnaires for assessing the psychosocial environment and student attitudes associated with learning business statistics in computing laboratory workshops. The Business Statistics Computer Learning Environment Inventory (BSCLEI) and Attitude to Business Analytics instrument were validated with 275 students enrolled across various business degree programs in the United Kingdom over two academic years. Various data analyses (including exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses) supported the validity of these two questionnaires, thereby paving the way for their future use in research and practical applications relevant to learning environments in higher-education statistics workshop classrooms.

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Acknowledgement

We are grateful to Michael Newby for his insightful comments on a draft version of this article.

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Correspondence to Barry J. Fraser.

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Nguyen-Newby, T.H., Fraser, B.J. Computer laboratory workshops as learning environments for university business statistics: validation of questionnaires. Learning Environ Res (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10984-020-09324-z

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Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Attitude–environment associations
  • Business statistics
  • Computer laboratory workshops
  • Higher education
  • Learning environment