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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 303, Issue 3, pp 2579–2583 | Cite as

Development of a simple method for the immobilization of anti-thyroxine antibody on polystyrene tubes for use in the measurement of total thyroxine in serum

  • Rani Gnanasekar
  • Shalaka Paradkar
  • Vijay Kadwad
  • Ketaki Bapat
  • Grace Samuel
  • S. S. Sachdev
  • N. Sivaprasad
Article
  • 75 Downloads

Abstract

We describe a simple method for the immobilisation of anti-thyroxine antibody on to the surface of polystyrene tubes and a simple assay format for the quantitative estimation of total thyroxine in serum. The immobilisation of anti-thyroxine antibody was achieved through passive adsorption of normal rabbit gamma globulin and anti-rabbit antibody raised in goat, as immune bridges. This procedure ensured minimum utilisation of primary and secondary antibody as neat sera without precipitation or affinity purification. The developed assay system using these antibody coated tubes covers a range of 0–240 ng/mL of thyroxine with intra and inter assay variations of less than 10 %.

Keywords

Immune bridges Passive adsorption Denaturation Hydrophobic interaction Anti-thyroxine coated tubes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Dr. A.K. Kohli, Chief Executive, BRIT for his constant support and encouragement. We sincerely thank Late Shri.U.H. Nagvekar who had initiated this work.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rani Gnanasekar
    • 1
  • Shalaka Paradkar
    • 1
  • Vijay Kadwad
    • 1
  • Ketaki Bapat
    • 1
  • Grace Samuel
    • 1
  • S. S. Sachdev
    • 1
  • N. Sivaprasad
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Atomic EnergyRadiopharmaceuticals Programme, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT)MumbaiIndia

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