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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 303, Issue 2, pp 1291–1295 | Cite as

A passive collection system for whole size fractions in river suspended solids

  • Takeshi Matsunaga
  • Takahiro Nakanishi
  • Mariko Atarashi-Andoh
  • Erina Takeuchi
  • Katsunori Tsuduki
  • Syusaku Nishimura
  • Jun Koarashi
  • Shigeyoshi Otosaka
  • Tsutomu Sato
  • Seiya Nagao
Article

Abstract

In order to solve difficulties in collection of river suspended solids (SS) such as frequent observations during stochastic rainfall events, a simple passive collection system of SS has been developed. It is composed of sequentially connected two large-scale filter vessels. A portion of river water flows down into the filter vessels utilizing a natural drop of streambed. The system enable us to carry out long-term, unmanned SS collection. It is also compatible with dissolved component collection. Its performance was validated in a forested catchment by applying to radiocesium and stable carbon transport.

Keywords

Suspended solids Passive collection Radiocesium Stable carbon Fluvial transport 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge forestry management authorities in Ibaraki Prefecture and the Forestry Agency for permission to use the preserved forest. They are indebted to the plot landowner for a precipitation gauge. The technical assistance from Masahiro Hirasawa, Makiko Ishihara, and Kazumi Matsumura was essential in this study.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Takahiro Nakanishi
    • 1
  • Mariko Atarashi-Andoh
    • 1
  • Erina Takeuchi
    • 1
  • Katsunori Tsuduki
    • 1
  • Syusaku Nishimura
    • 1
  • Jun Koarashi
    • 1
  • Shigeyoshi Otosaka
    • 1
  • Tsutomu Sato
    • 2
  • Seiya Nagao
    • 3
  1. 1.Nuclear Science and Engineering CenterJapan Atomic Energy AgencyTokai-muraJapan
  2. 2.Division of Sustainable Resources Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  3. 3.Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory, Institute of Nature and Environmental TechnologyKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan

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