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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 291, Issue 2, pp 461–466 | Cite as

Irradiation and measurement devices and methods development for LSNAA applications at the TRIGA-ACPR core

  • Csaba Roth
  • Dumitru Barbos
  • Daniela Gugiu
  • Adrian Datcu
  • Dumitru Dobrea
  • Marin Preda
  • Mihai Gligor
  • Madinka Bright Mweetwa
Article

Abstract

A Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis (LSNAA) facility has been developed at the TRIGA-Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti. The central irradiation cavity of ACPR can accommodate a large irradiation device. The ACPR neutron flux characteristics are well known and spectrum adjustment techniques have been successfully applied to enhance the thermal component of the neutron flux in the central irradiation cavity. An analysis methodology was developed by employing the MCNP (a general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code) code in order to estimate counting efficiency and correction factors for the major perturbing phenomena. The paper presents the development of the experimental device, the results of the neutron flux-spectrum characterization, and preliminary steps to validate the analysis methodology.

Keywords

Neutron Activation Large sample Flux-spectrum 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The work presented in this paper was performed in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project “Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis Techniques for Inhomogeneous Bulk Archaeological Samples and Large Objects”. We express our gratitude for the International Atomic Energy Agency financial support and greatly appreciate the useful and high quality technical supervision offered during the Project.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Csaba Roth
    • 1
  • Dumitru Barbos
    • 1
  • Daniela Gugiu
    • 1
  • Adrian Datcu
    • 1
  • Dumitru Dobrea
    • 1
  • Marin Preda
    • 1
  • Mihai Gligor
    • 2
  • Madinka Bright Mweetwa
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Nuclear Research PitestiMioveni, ArgesRomania
  2. 2.Systemic Archaeological Institute, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba IuliaAlba IuliaRomania
  3. 3.National Institute for Scientific and Industrial ResearchLusakaZambia

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