Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 289, Issue 3, pp 789–794 | Cite as

Development of a Bonner sphere spectrometer with emphasis on decreasing the contribution of scattering by using a new designed shadow cone



In this study, the Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) used for measurement of neutron spectra based a BF3 long counter. The most important problem for this system was a high count of scattered neutrons. This spectrometer was established by designed a new shadow cone with a smaller length and improved attenuation coefficient. Because of shortening the length of the shadow cone, distance of source and center of the sphere was decreased. Furthermore, external part of the thermal detector was covered with a suitable layer to reduce the contribution count of scattering neutrons. Experimental results show that BSS system with BF3 long cylindrical counter, applying the proper developments, can be used in neutron fluence spectrometry.


Neutron spectrometry Bonner sphere Shadow cone method Monte Carlo calculation Scattered neutrons 


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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Physics Department, Faculty of SciencesGolestan UniversityGorganIran
  2. 2.Physics Department, School of SciencesFerdowsi University of MashhadMashhadIran

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