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Labelled compounds as radiopharmaceuticals for radiosynoviorthesis

  • F. Melichar
  • M. Kropacek
  • J. Srank
  • M. Beran
  • M. Mirzajevova
  • J. Zimova
  • K. Eigner-Henke
  • M. Forsterova
Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry

Abstract

Radiopharmaceuticals for radiosynoviorthesis are designed as suspension (colloidal) of particles in sterile and pyrogen free form, where radionuclide (active substance) fix on carrier which is form solid particles or gel form. Generally, radionuclide and carrier have to fulfil the request of sterility, chemical purity, non toxicity, non allergen and low cost preparation. In term of the radionuclide purity, beta-emission with sufficient energy for penetration and ablation the synovial tissue and low gamma-radiation is requested. The radionuclide gold-198 in colloidal form was used as radiopharmaceutical for radiosynoviorthesis at first. Presently, beta-emitting radionuclides, which have no or only a minimal gammaemission, are used. Between such radionuclides is possible to insert: yttrium-90, rhenium-186 and radiolanthanoides — dysprosium-165, holmium-166 and erbium-169. In this paper are presented experiences with preparation [166Ho] Holmium-Macroaggregates ([166Ho] holmium-MA), [166Ho] holmium-Polylactic Acid Microspheres ([166Ho] Ho-PLA-MS) which are potential candidate for radiosynoviorhesis.

Keywords

Radionuclide Polylactic Acid Synovial Tissue Holmium Radionuclide Purity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Melichar
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. Kropacek
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Srank
    • 1
  • M. Beran
    • 1
  • M. Mirzajevova
    • 1
  • J. Zimova
    • 1
  • K. Eigner-Henke
    • 1
  • M. Forsterova
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiopharmaceuticalsNuclear Physics InstituteHusinec-Rez 130Czech Republic
  2. 2.Centrum of ResearchHusinec-Rez 130Czech Republic
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3rd Faculty of MedicineCharles University PragueHusinec-Rez 130Czech Republic

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