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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 283, Issue 1, pp 171–176 | Cite as

Salt evaporation behaviors of uranium deposits from an electrorefiner

  • Sung Bin Park
  • Dong Wook Cho
  • Gyu Hwan Oh
  • Jong Hyeon Lee
  • Sung Chan Hwang
  • Young Ho Kang
  • Hansoo Lee
  • Eung Ho Kim
  • Seong-Won Park
Article

Abstract

From an electrorefining process, uranium deposits were recovered at the solid cathode of an electrorefining system. The uranium deposits from the electrorefiner contained about 30–40 wt% salts. In order to recover pure uranium and transform it into metal ingots, these salts have to be removed. A salt distiller was adapted for a salt evaporation. A batch operation for the salt removal was carried out by a heating and a vacuum evaporation. The operational conditions were a 700–1,000 °C hold temperature and less than a 1 Torr under Argon atmosphere, respectively. The behaviors of the salt evaporations were investigated by focusing on the effects of the pressure and the holding temperature for the salt distillation. The removal efficiencies of the salts were obtained with regard to the operational conditions. The experimental results of the salt evaporations were evaluated by using the Hertz-Langmuir relation. The effective evaporation coefficients of this relation were obtained with regards to the vacuum pressures and the hold temperatures. The higher the vacuum pressure and the higher the holding temperature were, the higher the removal efficiencies of the salts were.

Keywords

Electrorefining Cathode process Uranium deposit Salt Evaporation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors appreciate the support of the Ministry of Science & Technology. This research is implemented as part of the National Mid- and Long-term Atomic Energy R&D Program, which is supported by the Ministry of Science & Technology.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sung Bin Park
    • 1
  • Dong Wook Cho
    • 1
  • Gyu Hwan Oh
    • 1
  • Jong Hyeon Lee
    • 2
  • Sung Chan Hwang
    • 1
  • Young Ho Kang
    • 1
  • Hansoo Lee
    • 1
  • Eung Ho Kim
    • 1
  • Seong-Won Park
    • 1
  1. 1.Korea Atomic Energy Research InstituteYuseong-gu, DaejeonKorea
  2. 2.Department of Nano Materials EngineeringChungnam National UniversityYuseong-gu, DaejeonKorea

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