Advertisement

Journal of Solution Chemistry

, Volume 35, Issue 7, pp 1029–1036 | Cite as

Partial Molar Volumes of Phenylacetic Acid and Several Polysubstituted Benzenes at Infinite Dilution in Water at Temperatures T = 298 to 373 K and at Pressures up to 30 MPa

  • Lucie Stříteská
  • Lubomír Hnědkovský
  • Ivan Cibulka
Original Paper
  • 45 Downloads

Abstract

Density data for dilute aqueous solutions of phenylacetic acid, benzene-1, 2-dicarboxylic acid (phtalic acid), benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid and 1,2,3-trihydroxy- benzene (pyrogallol) are presented together with the partial molar volumes at infinite dilution calculated from the experimental data. The measurements were performed at temperatures from T=298.15 K up to T=373.15 K and at three pressures up to 30 MPa. The data were obtained using a high-temperature, high-pressure flow vibrating-tube densimeter.

Keywords

Density Partial molar volume Aqueous solutions Phenylacetic acid Benzene-1 2-dicarboxylic acid Benzene-1 4-tricarboxylic acid 3-Trihydroxybenzene High temperature High pressure 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

Supplementary material

10953_2006_9045_MOESEM1_ESM.doc (93 kb)
Lucie Střiteská, Lubomír Hnědkovský, and Ivan Cibulka: Partial molar volumes of phenylacetic acid and several polysubstituted benzenes at infinite dilution in water at temperatures T = 298 K to 373 K and at pressures up to 30 MPa.

References

  1. 1.
    Hnědkovský, L., Cibulka, I.: Group contributions for an estimation of partial molar volumes at infinite dilution for aqueous organic solutes at extended ranges of temperature and pressure. Int. J. Thermophys. 25, 387–395 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hynek, V., Hnědkovský, L., Cibulka, I.: A new design of a vibrating-tube densimeter and partial molar volumes of phenol(aq) at temperatures from 298 to 573 K. J. Chem. Thermodyn. 29, 1237–1252 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hnědkovský, L., Cibulka, I.: An automated vibrating-tube densimeter for measurements of small density differences in dilute aqueous solutions. Int. J. Thermophys. 25, 1135–1142 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hill, P.G.: A unified fundamental equation for the thermodynamic properties of water. J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 19, 1233–1274 (1990)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Jacobsen, R. T., Stewart, R. B., Jahangiri, M.: Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen from the freezing line to 2000 K at pressures to 1000 MPa. J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 15, 735–909 (1986)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hyněica, P., Hnědkovský, L., Cibulka, I.: Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. X. Benzene and toluene at temperatures T = 298 K to 573 K and at pressures up to 30 MPa. J. Chem. Thermodyn. 35, 1905–1915 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Jedelský, J., Hnědkovský, L., Hyněica, P., Cibulka, I.: Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. IV. Benzoic and hydroxybenzoic acids at temperatures T = (298 to 498) K and pressures up to 30 MPa. J. Chem. Thermodyn. 32, 1299–1310 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jedelský, J., Hnědkovský, L., Cibulka, I.: Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. II. Dihydroxybenzenes at temperatures T = (298 to 498) K and pressures up to 30 MPa. J. Chem. Thermodyn. 31, 27–42 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucie Stříteská
    • 1
  • Lubomír Hnědkovský
    • 1
  • Ivan Cibulka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physical ChemistryInstitute of Chemical TechnologyPragueCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations