Psychometric Properties of the Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief-RCOPE) in Chilean Adults Exposed to Stressful Events

Abstract

Among the different ways of coping with stress, religious coping has shown particularly the promising results; nonetheless, there are few validated instruments to assess it in non-English language. This article presents the psychometric properties of the Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief-RCOPE) in Chilean adults exposed to stressful events. The scale shows a reliability, test–retest stability, and confirmatory factor analysis support structural validity. The scale also shows concurrent validity with another measure of religious coping. Finally, confirming predictive criterion validity, negative religious coping predicts posttraumatic stress symptoms 6 months after, but not posttraumatic growth. Positive religious coping was associated with posttraumatic growth enhancement. This study shows Brief-RCOPE as a valid and reliable instrument for measuring religious coping in this population.

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Funding

This study was funded by the Chilean Grant CONICYT/FONDECYT No. 1180134 for Felipe E. García, by the Chilean Grant CONICYT/FONDECYT No. 1181533 and PIA CONICYT CIE160009 for Juan C. Oyanedel and by the Spanish Grant PSI2014-51923-P for Darío Páez Grant number Ref IT-1187-19 of Culture, Cognition and Emotion, University of the Basque Country and Basque Govern.

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Correspondence to Felipe E. García.

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All procedures performed were approved by the Ethics Committee of Santo Tomás University, Chile (No. 89/2014), the Ethics Committee of the Mutual Insurance Company (Mutual de Seguridad), Chile (No. 03/15), and in accordance with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments.

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Appendix 1

Appendix 1

See Table 5.

Table 5 Brief-RCOPE (Pargament et al. 2011; adap: García et al. 2014)

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García, F.E., Oyanedel, J.C., Páez, D. et al. Psychometric Properties of the Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief-RCOPE) in Chilean Adults Exposed to Stressful Events. J Relig Health 60, 475–487 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-019-00976-7

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Keywords

  • Confirmatory factor analysis
  • Posttraumatic growth
  • Posttraumatic stress symptoms
  • Religion
  • Religiosity