Advertisement

Understanding the Perception of Islamic Medicine Among the Malaysian Muslim Community

  • Khadher Ahmad
  • Mohd Farhan Md Ariffin
  • Fauzi Deraman
  • Sedek Ariffin
  • Mustaffa Abdullah
  • Monika Munirah Abd Razzak
  • M. Y. Zulkifli Mohd Yusoff
  • Meguellati Achour
Original Paper

Abstract

This study was conducted to identify and describe the patients’ perceptions of Islamic medicine based on gender, age, marital, educational level and working status among the Malaysian Muslim population. A nationwide interviewer-administered questionnaire survey was conducted in 2013. An open-ended questionnaire pertaining to Islamic medicine was used to increase the probability of capturing maximum data. This survey implemented a multistage design, stratified by state, proportionate to the size of the state population and was representative of the Malaysian population. Post-survey classification of results was performed accordingly. Complex data analysis was carried out using SPSS 16.0. The discussion was identified and categorised into various sections. The paper concludes that Islamic medicine has a major influence in the Malaysian Muslim community compared to other alternatives. Further, its potential for growth and importance especially for treating spiritual ailments cannot be denied. The respondents indicated that two factors motivate Islamic medicine in Malaysia: (1) the Muslim community opts for alternative healing because of their dissatisfaction with conventional methods; (2) Islamic medicine focuses only on healing spiritual-related problems. The average perception of respondents is that the function of Islamic medicine in healing physical diseases is undervalued and that it is not suitable to replace the functions of modern health institutions.

Keywords

Islamic medicine Spiritual disorder Malaysia Perception Function 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Academy of Islamic Studies at University of Malaya for their continuous support for the research and writing of this article. The authors would also like to thank Department of al-Quran and al-Hadith, Academy of Islamic Studies, for financial assistance to cover publication fees of this article. The Grant provided to the authors under Research Project FP025-2015A is highly appreciated.

Funding

This study was funded by University of Malaya (FP025-2015A).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

References

  1. Abdul Ghani, M. (2004). Penggunaan Ayat al-Qur’an dalam Bidang Perubatan: Kajian di Darussyifa’, Bangi, Disertasi Sarjana, Jabatan al-Quran dan al-Hadith, Akademi Pengajian Islam, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
  2. Abuduli, M., Ezat, W. P., & Aljunid, S. (2011). Role of traditional and complementary medicine in universal coverage. Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine, 11(2), 1–5.Google Scholar
  3. Al-Rawi, S., & Fetters, M. D. (2012). Traditional Arabic & Islamic medicine: A conceptual model for clinicians and researchers. Global J Health Sc, 4(3), 164–169.Google Scholar
  4. Asman, O. (2008). qur’anic healing for spiritual ailments: Between tradition, religious law and contemporary law. Medical Law, 27, 259–284.Google Scholar
  5. Azaizeh, H., Saad, B., Cooper, E., & Said, O. (2010). Traditional Arabic and Islamic medicine. A Re-Emerging Health Aid, eCAM, 7(4), 419–424.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Baharuddin, A. (1993). Science and belief: Discourse on new perceptions. Kuala Lumpur: Institut Kajian Dasar.Google Scholar
  7. Bodeker, G., Ong, C. K., Grundy, C., Burford, G., & Shein, K. (2005). WHO global atlas of traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Japan: WHO Kobe Centre.Google Scholar
  8. Deuraseh, N., & Mohd Tohar, S. N. A. (2007). Healing through Ruqyah (Incantation) with special focus on the perception of Malay-Muslim society in Kelantan and Terengganu on Ruqyah as an alternative way of healing in Malaysia. Journal of International Society for the History of Islamic Medicine, 6–7, 50–54.Google Scholar
  9. Ernst, E. (1999). Prevalence of complementary/alternative medicine for children: A systematic review. European Journal of Pediatrics, 158(1), 7–11.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Hamidah, A. M. D., Zainudin, A., Rustam, M. D., Azmi, M., Tamil, M. D., Latiff, A., et al. (2009). Prevalence and parental perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine use by children with cancer in a multi-ethnic Southeast Asian population. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 52, 70–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ibrahim, B. S. (2003). Spiritual medicine in the history of Islamic medicine. Journal of the International Society for the History of Islamic Medicine, 2(4), 45–49.Google Scholar
  12. Kabit, D. A. H. et al. (eds) (2007). Annual Report Ministry of Health Malaysia 2007, Putrajaya: Ministry of Health Malaysia. http://www.moh.gov.my/images/gallery/publications/md/ar/2007-2.pdf.
  13. Khadher, A. (2012). Analisis Hadith Mengenai Rawatan Sihir Dalam al-Kutub al-Sittah: Aplikasi di Pusat Rawatan Islam di Malaysia, (Ph.D. Thesis, Department of al-Quran and al-Hadith, Academy of Islamic Studies, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
  14. Mohd Farhan, M. A., Khadher, A., Muhammad Ikhlas, R., & Mohamad Zaim, I. (2016). Rawatan Kesihatan Berasaskan Perubatan Alternatif Islam: Persepsi Masyarakat Di Malaysia, Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka (DBP): Sidang Ke-55 MABBIM pada 4–7 April 2016. Jurnal Rampak Serantau, 23(6), 1–30.Google Scholar
  15. Nagamia, H. (2003). Islamic medicine history and current practice. Journal of the International Society for the History of Islamic Medicine, 2(4), 19–30.Google Scholar
  16. Norhasmilia, S., Mazanah, M., & Steven, E. K. (2014). The Islamic healing approach to cancer treatment in Malaysia. Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Health Care, 4(6), 1–7.Google Scholar
  17. Roland, W. (1983). Transcultural healing, the whole human. Kuala Lumpur: University Malaya Press.Google Scholar
  18. Salim, M. A. (2004). From the biomedical model to the Islamic alternative: A brief overview of medical practices in the contemporary arab world. Social Science and Medicine, 58(4), 697–702.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Siti, Z. M., Tahir, A., Farah, A. I., Fazlin, S. M., Sondi, S., Azman, A. H., et al. (2009). Use of traditional and complementary medicine in Malaysia: A baseline study. Complement Ther Med, 17(5–6), 292–299.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Suhaiza H. M. Z. (2015). Islamic Medical Practice: A Prospect of Islamic Medical Tourism, in Research report issued by the University of Malaya 1, 15-16. Link: http://umresearch.um.edu.my/Vol12015/index.html#p=15.
  21. Traditional and Complementary Medicine (Bahagian Perubatan Tradisional dan Komplementari) at URL: http://tcm.moh.gov.my/v4/bmelayu/.
  22. The World Health Organisation (2001). Legal Status of Traditional Medicine and Complementary/Alternative Medicine, A Worldwide Review. Geneva: WHO, WHO/EDM/TRM/2001.2.Google Scholar
  23. Tovey, P. (1997). Contingent legitimacy: UK alternative practitioners and inter-sectoral acceptance. Social Science and Medicine, 45, 1129–1133.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Xu, H., & Chen, K. J. (2012). Complementary and alternative medicine: Is it possible to be mainstream? Chin J Integr Med, 18(6), 403–404.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Yucel, S. (2007). The Effects of Prayer on Muslim Patients’ Well-Being. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Boston University School of Theology, Boston, USA.Google Scholar
  26. Zulfakar, R. S. (2010). Pendakwaan Jenayah Sihir: Prinsip-Prinsip Pembuktian dan Akta Keterangan Mahkamah Syariah” (kertas kerja, Muzakarah Pakar: Pendakwaan Pesalah Sihir di Mahkamah Syariah. Shah Alam, Malaysia: Jabatan Mufti Negeri Selangor dengan kerjasama PISANG.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khadher Ahmad
    • 1
  • Mohd Farhan Md Ariffin
    • 1
  • Fauzi Deraman
    • 1
  • Sedek Ariffin
    • 1
  • Mustaffa Abdullah
    • 1
  • Monika Munirah Abd Razzak
    • 1
  • M. Y. Zulkifli Mohd Yusoff
    • 1
  • Meguellati Achour
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of al-Quran and al-Hadith, Academy of Islamic StudiesUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia
  2. 2.Research and Development Division, Academy of Islamic StudiesUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia

Personalised recommendations