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Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 108–119 | Cite as

Revisiting Jung’s “A Psychological Approach to the Dogma of the Trinity”: Some Implications for Psychoanalysis and Religion

  • Amy Bentley Lamborn
Original paper
  • 209 Downloads

Abstract

This article explores one of C. G. Jung’s generally neglected essays, his psychological interpretation of the Trinity, and links up key theoretical notions with several more mainstream psychoanalytic concepts. It further uses the notions of oneness, otherness, thirdness, and the fourth to consider the recent points of convergence between psychoanalysis and religion.

Keywords

Psychoanalysis and religion Jung and the Trinity The third The fourth Deus abscunditus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BronxUSA

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