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Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 67–79 | Cite as

Cardiovascular Health Status and Health Risk Assessment Method of Preference Among Worksite Employees

  • Lisa M. Marschke
  • George J. Allen
  • Denis A. Coble
  • Scott R. Zellner
  • Randi Klein
  • Barbara Aiudi
  • Donna Murphy
  • Linda S. Pescatello
Article

We investigated whether employees (n = 62) selecting a self-report Health Risk Assessment (HRA) would be at increased CVD risk compared to employees (n = 114) choosing an HRA with measurement of cardiovascular (CVD) health indicators. Participants were mostly middle-aged (44.1 ± 0.8 yr) men (71.6%) displaying borderline features of the cardiometabolic syndrome. Although there were no significant differences between the groups regarding their measured CVD health status or self-reported lifestyle habits, employees in both groups consistently over-stated their level of cardiovascular health. Contrary to reports in the literature, cardiovascular health status did not appear to influence employee HRA method of preference.

Editors' Strategic Implications: These findings await replication in other samples, both more diverse and less self-selected. Nonetheless, the authors' methods and their conclusions about workers' over-estimation of their health and the lack of differences across assessment methods will be useful to employers, health professionals, and all practitioners with an interest in health risk assessments.

KEY WORDS:

cardiovascular disease health promotion health screen metabolic syndrome self-report 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa M. Marschke
    • 1
    • 4
  • George J. Allen
    • 1
  • Denis A. Coble
    • 1
  • Scott R. Zellner
    • 1
  • Randi Klein
    • 1
  • Barbara Aiudi
    • 2
  • Donna Murphy
    • 3
  • Linda S. Pescatello
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Pratt & Whitney, A Division of United Technologies CorporationHartfordUSA
  3. 3.New Britain General HospitalNew BritainUSA
  4. 4.Health Care of Southeastern MA, Inc.BrocktonUSA

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