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The Protein Journal

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 147–155 | Cite as

Determination of Primary Structure of Two Isoforms 6-1 and 6-2 PLA2 D49 from Bothrops jararacussu Snake Venom and Neurotoxic Characterization Using in vitro Neuromuscular Preparation

  • L. A. Ponce-Soto
  • V. L. Bonfim
  • L. Rodrigues-Simioni
  • J. C. Novello
  • S. Marangoni
Article

In this paper we reported the purification, the biological characterization and the amino acid sequence of two new isoforms basic 6-1 (Bj-IV) and 6-2 (Bj-V) PLA2 D49 purified from the Bothrops jararacussu venom

The isoforms 6-1 and 6-2 had a sequence of amino acids of 121 amino acid residues 6-1: DLFEWGQMIL KETGKNPFPY YGAYGCYCGW GGRGKPKDKD TDRCCYVHDC CYKKLTGCPK TDDRYSYSWL DLTIVCGEDD PCKELCECDK AIAVCFRENL GTYNKKYRYH LKPCKKADKP C and pI value 7.83 and 6-2: DLWQFGQMIL KETGKIPFPY YGAYGCYCGW GGRGGKPKDG TDRCCYVHDC CYKKLTGCPK TDDRYSYSWL DLTIVCGEDD PCKELCECDK AIAVCFRENL GTYNKKYRYH LKPCKKADKP C with a pI value of 7.99

Skeletal muscle preparations from the young chicken have been used previously in order to study the effects of toxins on neuromuscular transmission, providing an important opportunity to study the differentiated behavior of a toxin before more than one model, because it shows differences in its sensibilities

Both isoforms have produced neuromuscular blockade in young chicken biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations in presence or absence of crotapotin crotalic (F3 and F4) indicating that catalytic activity was not essential for neuromuscular action in this preparation.

Keywords

Phospholipase A2 snake venom Bothrops jararacussu neuromuscular preparations neurotoxic characterization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Ponce-Soto
    • 1
  • V. L. Bonfim
    • 1
  • L. Rodrigues-Simioni
    • 2
  • J. C. Novello
    • 1
  • S. Marangoni
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryInstitute of Biology, State University of CampinasCampinasBrazil
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyMedical Sciences School, State University of CampinasCampinasBrazil

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