Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 115–132 | Cite as

Visualizing Risk: Images, Risk and Fear in a Health Campaign

Article

Abstract

This essay considers the structure of risk in health campaign formation and design by examining an early 20th century federal campaign to reduce infant mortality. Health campaigns navigate the gap between study and practice, translating quantitative findings into prescriptive responses for individual consumers of the text. By focusing specifically on the visual rhetoric of risk, this campaign serves as a case study to examine how the public was taught to see and understand risk and preventive health at a critical point in the development of public health in the United States.

Keywords

Visual rhetoric Risk Fear appeals Health campaign 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication Arts and SciencesPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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