Dielectric Response in the First Silicon Phthalocyanine Network Polymer



Unlike the well known silicon phthalocyanine polymers, which are only bridged polymers, the first silicon-phthalocyanine network polymer [PcSiCl2] x 6 was prepared from commercially available precursors. Based on previous modeling studies, elemental composition allowed for determination of both the shape and the content of Pc units in the prepared polymer. The two-dimensional network structure was found to offer an extension of the conjugation of the 18-π electron system of the phthalocyanine and facilitate the charge mobility across the material. This was found to enhance the conductivity and dielectric properties of the material, relative to the analogue materials, by supporting the hoping conduction mechanism. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to follow the non-oxidative thermal degradation of the prepared polymeric material. An interesting phenomenon, water effusion, was detected and proved to play a role in the conduction mechanism. Electrical and dielectric measurements were carried out at different frequencies. The polymer has extremely high values of the permittivity ε′ and dielectric loss ε″ at lower frequencies that decrease gradually with increasing frequency. The relaxation peak at lower frequencies showed without doubt that the moisture enhances the conductivity.


Conductivity Dielectric permittivity Polymers Phthalocyanines Silicon 



We are grateful for the financial support of (National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza, Egypt) within the In-house research project number 914-01-02.

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (DOC 69 kb)


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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Polymers and PigmentsNational Research CentreGizaEgypt
  2. 2.Department of Microwave Physics and DielectricsNational Research CentreGizaEgypt

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