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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 895–904 | Cite as

Pharmacy Students’ Use of and Beliefs About Traditional Healthcare

  • Mudassir Anwar
  • Pauline Norris
  • James Green
  • Shirley Au
  • Grace Li
  • Mandy Ma
  • Richard Prentice
  • Audrey Shum
  • Louisa-Ann Siaw
  • Sujeong Yoo
  • Shuyi Zhang
Original Paper

Abstract

Health professional students come from many different cultural backgrounds, and may be users of traditional healthcare (also known as ethnomedicine or folk medicine). This study aimed to explore New Zealand pharmacy students’ knowledge and beliefs about traditional healthcare, and to examine whether these changed during the course. A questionnaire was administered to students in 2011 and again in 2013. Students were from a wide range of ethnic groups. Their reported use of traditional healthcare increased (from 48 % in 2011 to 61 % in 2013) and was usually for minor illness or prevention. Non New Zealand European students were more likely to use traditional healthcare. Use of traditional healthcare was relatively common, and after exposure to a biomedical curriculum students seemed to be more, rather than less likely to report using traditional healthcare. Education about traditional healthcare should not be based on the assumption that all healthcare students are unfamiliar with, or non-users of, traditional healthcare.

Keywords

Traditional medicine Pharmacy Students New Zealand Cultural competence 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank the students who participated in the study, and Vicky McLeod and Sarah Wilson for research assistance. No external funding was obtained for the project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mudassir Anwar
    • 1
  • Pauline Norris
    • 1
  • James Green
    • 1
  • Shirley Au
    • 1
  • Grace Li
    • 1
  • Mandy Ma
    • 1
  • Richard Prentice
    • 1
  • Audrey Shum
    • 1
  • Louisa-Ann Siaw
    • 1
  • Sujeong Yoo
    • 1
  • Shuyi Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PharmacyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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