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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 249–254 | Cite as

Immigrants Present Improved Obstetric and Neonatal Outcomes Compared to Native Women. A Northern Greek Population Analysis

  • Chrysoula Margioula-Siarkou
  • Stamatios Petousis
  • Ioannis Kalogiannidis
  • Themistoklis Dagklis
  • Vasilios Traianos
  • Michalis Goutzioulis
  • Nikos Prapas
  • Theodoros Agorastos
Original Paper

Abstract

To compare the incidence of obstetric and neonatal outcomes between native and immigrant women. A retrospective cohort of singleton pregnancies was conducted concerning the period 2003–2009. Women were divided in group 1, including natives and group 2, including immigrants. Epidemiological characteristics, obstetric outcomes and neonatal morbidity parameters were studied. Out of 7033 singleton pregnancies delivered during this period, 6980 with complete information were finally included. Immigrants consisted 47.59 % of all gravidas (group 2, n = 3322), presenting significantly lower rates of emergency caesarean section, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, placenta praevia and fetal distress. Furthermore, all parameters of neonatal morbidity, including Mean Apgar score in the 1st and 5th minute as well as rates of NICU admission and emergency intubation were significantly improved in the group of immigrants. According to our results, pregnancies of immigrant women are less likely to be complicated by severe obstetric and neonatal outcomes.

Keywords

Natives Immigrants Obstetric outcomes Neonatal morbidity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chrysoula Margioula-Siarkou
    • 1
  • Stamatios Petousis
    • 1
  • Ioannis Kalogiannidis
    • 1
  • Themistoklis Dagklis
    • 1
  • Vasilios Traianos
    • 1
  • Michalis Goutzioulis
    • 1
  • Nikos Prapas
    • 1
  • Theodoros Agorastos
    • 1
  1. 1.4th Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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