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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 321–325 | Cite as

Dual Vulnerability of Being Both a Teen and an Immigrant Parent: Illustrations from an Italian Context

  • Gina Riccio
  • Emma Baumgartner
  • Yvonne Bohr
  • Deborah Kanter
  • Fiorenzo Laghi
Brief Communication

Abstract

Italy has experienced a recent surge in immigration, which has led to an increase in the country’s birth rate. Many immigrant mothers are adolescent parents. 30 adolescent mothers (17 recent immigrants and 13 adolescents of Italian descent) completed measures of adolescent self-development and motherhood, perceived availability and satisfaction with social support, and emotional and behavioral characteristic of their children. Findings suggest that immigrant teen mothers show more difficulties related to parenting than do Italian born teen mothers. In particular, immigrant teen mothers report lower levels of social support satisfaction and availability, higher levels of parent–child dysfunction, and experience motherhood and child behavior as more problematic. The findings highlight and confirm the need for well-designed, specific supportive services for adolescent immigrant mothers.

Keywords

Immigration Teen pregnancy Risk factors Social support 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gina Riccio
    • 1
  • Emma Baumgartner
    • 1
  • Yvonne Bohr
    • 2
  • Deborah Kanter
    • 2
  • Fiorenzo Laghi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, SapienzaUniversity of RomeRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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