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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 310–313 | Cite as

Training Mixtec Promotores to Assess Health Concerns in Their Community: A CBPR Pilot Study

  • Annette E. Maxwell
  • Sandra Young
  • Roena Rabelo Vega
  • Alison K. Herrmann
  • Cha See
  • Beth A. Glenn
  • Ritesh Mistry
  • Roshan Bastani
Brief Communication

Abstract

An academic institution and a community organization partnered for one of the first studies assessing health needs of Mixtecs, indigenous immigrants from Southern Mexico, residing in Ventura County, California. Ten bilingual Spanish- and Mixteco-speaking promotores received a 1-day focus group training, participated in a focus group themselves and conducted 5 focus groups with 42 Mixtec community members. The focus group training is described. Health concerns discussed in the focus groups include outdoor exercise among women viewed as flirtatious; reluctance to ask for governmental assistance due to fear that children will have to pay back later; soda consumption perceived as a symbol of socio-economic status; and unwillingness to obtain mammograms or pap smears because private body parts are to be touched by husbands only. Training promotores to conduct focus groups can increase organizational capacity to identify pressing health needs in under-represented and hard-to-reach population groups.

Keywords

Community capacity building Needs assessment Mixtec Focus group training 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funded in part by the UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity, a seed grant from the UCLA Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (U48DP001934) and the Charles Drew University/UCLA Cancer Center Partnership to Eliminate Cancer Health Disparities (NIH U54 CA143931).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annette E. Maxwell
    • 1
  • Sandra Young
    • 2
  • Roena Rabelo Vega
    • 1
  • Alison K. Herrmann
    • 1
  • Cha See
    • 1
  • Beth A. Glenn
    • 1
  • Ritesh Mistry
    • 1
  • Roshan Bastani
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research, Fielding School of Public Health and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Mixteco/Indígena Community Organizing Project (MICOP)OxnardUSA

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