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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 748–755 | Cite as

Identifying Psychosocial Stressors of Well-Being and Factors Related to Substance Use Among Latino Day Laborers

  • Nalini Junko Negi
Original Paper

Abstract

Day labor is largely comprised of young Latino immigrant men, many of who are undocumented, and thus vulnerable to a myriad of workers’ rights abuses. The difficult work and life conditions of this marginalized population may place them at heightened risk for mental health problems and substance use and abuse. However, factors related to Latino day laborers’ well-being and substance misuse are largely unknown. This article utilizes ethnographic and focus group methodology to elucidate participant identified factors associated to well-being and substance use and abuse. This study has implications for informing public health and social service programming as it provides thick description regarding the context and circumstances associated to increased vulnerability to substance abuse and lack of well-being among this hard-to-reach population of Latino immigrants.

Keywords

Latino Day laborers Migrants Substance use Mental health 

Notes

Conflict of interest

There are no possible conflicts of interest involving products or consultancies that are related to this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of Maryland, BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA

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