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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 249–257 | Cite as

Looking Under the Hispanic Umbrella: Cancer Mortality Among Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Other Hispanics in Florida

  • Dinorah Martinez-Tyson
  • Elizabeth Barnett Pathak
  • Hosanna Soler-Vila
  • Ann Marie Flores
Original Paper

Abstract

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among Hispanics. Most of the cancer statistics available both at the state and national levels report cancer statistics for all Hispanics as an aggregate group. The goal of this paper is to provide a population-based overview of cancer mortality among Hispanics (Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics) in Florida from 1990 to 2000 and to explore the demographic diversity of this growing ethnic group. The study population consisted of Hispanics and White non-Hispanics who died from cancer. Cancer mortality rates and proportion of cancer deaths by type and age at death for the selected racial/ethnic groups were calculated. Our findings indicate that the cancer death rates of the Hispanic subgroups compared favorably with those of White non-Hispanics and that cancer rates often presented for all Hispanics mask important differences between the different ethnic subgroups that fall under the Hispanic umbrella.

Keywords

Hispanics Hispanic Americans Neoplasms Cancer mortality Epidemiology Florida Cubans Puerto Ricans Mexicans 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Dr. Latetia Moore and Dr. Jihyun Lee for their assistance with data preparation and analysis as well as Dr. Cathy Meade and Janelle Menard for their support and editorial comments. Dr. Barnett Pathak was supported in part by an Established Investigator Grant from the American Heart Association. Dr. Soler-Vilá was supported in part by a Mentored Research Scholar Award from the American Cancer Society. Dr. Flores was supported in part by Project EXPORT from the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities/National Institutes of Health.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dinorah Martinez-Tyson
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Barnett Pathak
    • 2
  • Hosanna Soler-Vila
    • 3
  • Ann Marie Flores
    • 4
  1. 1.Health Outcomes and BehaviorH. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, FOW-EDUTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public HealthThe University of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Epidemiology and Public Health & Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer CenterLeonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of MiamiMiamiUSA
  4. 4.Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Oncology ProgramVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA

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