The Role of Psychological Capital in Academic Adjustment Among University Students

Abstract

To investigate the potential of psychological capital as a resource for academic adjustment, 250 BA students were asked to complete two questionnaires, one assessing participants’ psychological capacity, the other academic adjustment. Average grade-point scores were collected at two points in time as an additional measure of academic adjustment. Correlational as well as SEM analyses suggest that psychological capital is a positive resource with a central role in students’ academic adjustment. The study extends knowledge on the impact of psychological capital on positive organizational behavior by generalizing it to higher education.

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Change history

  • 24 December 2019

    In the original publication, Appendix 2: Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ) was included by the authors without obtaining permission to reproduce the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ). Appendix 2 is removed from the article.

  • 24 December 2019

    In the original publication, Appendix 2: Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ) was included by the authors without obtaining permission to reproduce the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ). Appendix 2 is removed from the article.

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Correspondence to Batel Hazan Liran.

Additional information

The original version of this article was revised: The Appendix 2 was removed.

Appendices

Appendix 1: Demographic Information Questionnaire

figurea

Appendix 2: Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ). This appendix has been removed because the authors have not obtained permission to reproduce the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ).

Appendix 3: Academic Adjustment Questionnaire

The following statements refer to personal attitudes and feelings many students may have with regard to their academic life. Please read each statement and circle the number that best describes your feelings regarding you as a university student.

  Suits me very much       Doesn’t suit me at all
1.Lately I’ve been feeling tense or nervous123456789
2.I keep up to date with my academic duties123456789
3.On campus I meet people and make friends123456789
4.Lately I’ve been feeling downcast and moody123456789
5.I’m very much involved in university social activities123456789
6.I’m happy with my decision to study at my university123456789
7.I have several close social ties at the university at which I study123456789
8.My academic goals are clear to me.123456789
9.Lately I have not been able to control my emotions very well123456789
10.I’m not satisfied with the variety of courses proposed at my university123456789
11.I’m satisfied with extracurricular activities at the university123456789
12.Lately I’ve been thinking about seeking psychological help123456789
13.If I could turn the clock back, I’d choose to study at another academic institution123456789
14.Lately I’ve been getting angry far too easily123456789
15.Even if I make an effort, I still don’t do well academically123456789
16.I have difficulty feeling comfortable in connecting with other students123456789
17.I haven’t been sleeping well lately123456789
18.I’m satisfied with the level of courses provided at my university123456789
19.I enjoy academic work123456789
20.I often feel lonely123456789
21.I find it hard to begin working on my course requirements123456789
22.I don’t use study time effectively.123456789
23.The services provided by the university’s offices meet my needs123456789
24.I am satisfied with my social life at the university campus123456789
25.I have good friends to talk with about problems123456789
26.I have trouble coping with study-related stress123456789
27.I think that my university is a good place to study123456789
28.I’m satisfied with the logistical services provided by my university (e.g., parking space, public transportation, cleanliness, food)123456789

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Hazan Liran, B., Miller, P. The Role of Psychological Capital in Academic Adjustment Among University Students. J Happiness Stud 20, 51–65 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-017-9933-3

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Keywords

  • Positive psychology
  • Psychological capital
  • Academic adjustment
  • GPA
  • University students