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Journal of Community Health

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 599–609 | Cite as

An Education Initiative Concerning Lead in an Arkansas Community: Results from Pre- and Post-Surveys

  • Alesia Ferguson
  • Barbara Gilkey
  • David Kern
  • Davis Jasmine
Original Paper

Abstract

The Arkansas People Participating in Lead Education (APPLE) Program is a collaborative effort between six Arkansas state, national and community organizations to provide lead awareness, training, and municipal legislation to needy communities in Arkansas. Under this program, APPLE organized and hosted well-designed, hands-on, and effective “call to action” lead awareness workshops for parents and community members in 10 needy communities over a 2 year period. Pre- and post-surveys were given to community members to access knowledge, attitudes and effectiveness of lead workshop activities, with demographic and another 13 and 11 questions on pre- and post-surveys, respectively. There were 709 adult attendees across the 10 workshop (Many children also attended.), with 460 completing pre-surveys, and 199 completed post-survey. Post-surveys were limited to four cities. The majority of those who completed surveys were African-American, reported as 78% on pre-surveys, with the majority also being parents (61%) and females. Although, 71% reported knowing that lead paint was bad for their health, more than 60% reported knowing little about lead exposure, and another 25% did not know the age of their residence. On the post-surveys, the majority of respondents found the workshop to be pleasant and informative (98%), while 45% had changed something in their lives to prevent lead exposure for a child and another 53% planned to make a change to prevent lead exposure for a child.

Keywords

Lead education Lead prevention Arkansas communities Community participation Workshop planning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alesia Ferguson
    • 1
  • Barbara Gilkey
    • 2
  • David Kern
    • 3
  • Davis Jasmine
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public HealthUniversity of Arkansas for Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA
  2. 2.Arkansas State HIPPY Program (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters)Little RockUSA
  3. 3.Air DivisionArkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ)Little RockUSA
  4. 4.Spellman UniversityAtlantaUSA

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