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Journal of Genetic Counseling

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 108–113 | Cite as

Evaluation of a Heredofamilial Cancer Unit in Increasing Family History Collection and Genetic Counseling Referrals Among Spanish Oncologists at a University Hospital

  • Iván Márquez-Rodas
  • Sara López-Tarruella
  • Yolanda Jerez
  • Mercedes Cavanagh
  • Sara Custodio
  • Daniel López-Trabada
  • Beatriz Moya
  • Sara Pérez
  • Ana B. Rupérez
  • Miguel Martín
Original Research

Abstract

A comprehensive family history is essential to identify patients at risk for hereditary cancer who could benefit from genetic counseling (GC). In a previous study, we observed a low occurrence of family history record (FHR) collection rate and GC referral among oncologists at our institution. The present work analyzes whether the implementation of a heredofamilial cancer unit (HFCU) would improve these parameters. We retrospectively compared the FHR rate in clinical records, National Cancer Institute (NCI) general criteria for hereditary cancer suspicion, GC referrals and FHR quality in two cohorts: cohort 1 (patients diagnosed before HFCU creation) and cohort 2 (after HFCU creation). Of 1,175 patients (590 cohort 1 and 585 cohort 2), FHRs were consigned in 27.3 % and 52.5 % of patients, respectively (p < 0.001). The GC referral of patients with any NCI criterion was 13.6 % xin cohort 1 vs. 40.5 % in cohort 2 (p < 0.001). FHR quality improved in terms of the total number of relatives (164 vs. 314, p = 0.1, N.S.) and number of healthy relatives consigned (80 vs. 191, p < 0.01). Nine mutations (6 BRCA, 1 MEN1, 2 Lynch), 4 unknown significance variants (all in BRCA) and 2 with no mutation were identified among patients referred from cohort 2. We conclude that the creation of a heredofamilial cancer unit has changed both FHR and GC referrals among oncologists at our institution, although continuous educational efforts are required.

Keywords

Hereditary cancer Genetic counseling Prevention Multidisciplinary approach Genetic testing Genetics referral 

Notes

Acknowledgments, funding and disclosures

The authors have no conflict of interest. Yolanda Jerez was recipient of a grant by Fundación de Investigación Biomédica Gregorio Marañón during the performance of the study. Editorial assistance was provided by an independent style corrector funded by Merck Serono. The authors retained full control of the manuscript’s content.

The data were previously presented, as a preliminary analysis, in the 37th ESMO 2012 Congress (September 30th, abstract 517p) Ann Oncol (2012) 23 (suppl 9): ix175–ix177.

Due to the retrospective nature of the study, and since the data had been anonymized, our IRB deemed it unnecessary to review this study.

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Copyright information

© National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iván Márquez-Rodas
    • 1
  • Sara López-Tarruella
    • 1
  • Yolanda Jerez
    • 1
  • Mercedes Cavanagh
    • 1
  • Sara Custodio
    • 1
  • Daniel López-Trabada
    • 1
  • Beatriz Moya
    • 1
  • Sara Pérez
    • 1
  • Ana B. Rupérez
    • 1
  • Miguel Martín
    • 1
  1. 1.Servicio de Oncología Médica; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio MarañónUniversidad ComplutenseMadridSpain

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