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Mock Juror Gender Biases and Perceptions of Self-Defense Claims in Intimate Partner Homicide

  • Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence in the Justice System
  • Published:
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Abstract

Findings are reported from an experiment that examined mock jurors’ gender biases regarding intimate homicide case adjudications. Mock jurors were more likely to convict a man than a woman who had killed an abusive partner, which was partially mediated by sympathy toward both the victim and defendant. Analyses revealed an abuser height and abuser gender interaction such that conviction rates for women defendants were higher when her abuser was taller compared to when he was shorter than she; abuser height did not influence conviction rates for men. Findings also suggested that when given information about a child being present, mock jurors perceived the killing of the abusive partner as an act to protect that child. The results are discussed in relation to how extra-legal factors impact juror perceptions of domestic violence cases in the courtroom.

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Correspondence to Nesa E. Wasarhaley.

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Hodell, E.C., Wasarhaley, N.E., Lynch, K.R. et al. Mock Juror Gender Biases and Perceptions of Self-Defense Claims in Intimate Partner Homicide. J Fam Viol 29, 495–506 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-014-9609-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-014-9609-2

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