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Journal of Fusion Energy

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 1009–1015 | Cite as

Effect of Li on Safety of Cu Components for EAST

  • Lizhi Peng
  • Jing Wu
  • Fang Ding
  • Sixiang Zhao
  • Li Qiao
  • Hongmin Mao
  • Peng Wang
  • Guang-Nan Luo
Original Research

Abstract

Cu–Li–Cu multilayers were deposited on Si substrate by alternately using magnetron sputtering and resistance evaporation. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) were utilized to study the interaction and diffusion between Cu and Li after 8 h heat treatments at 100, 280, and 480 °C. The RBS results reveal that Li can diffuse into Cu when the temperature rises to 480 °C. As a supplementary experiment on Cu corrosion by Li at lower temperature, bulk Li and Cu were annealed at 240, 320 and 400 °C for 8 h separately in a high-temperature furnace after sealing in quartz ampoules. Morphology images show that Li corrodes grain boundaries of Cu preferentially when the temperature is higher than the melting point of Li, and the corrosion rates are 0.7875, 0.925 and 3.3275 mg/h, respectively. The results are helpful for understanding the Cu corrosion and protecting the Cu components in EAST.

Keywords

Li Cu Diffusion Corrosion EAST 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by basic materials research and operation program, National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program No. 2013GB105001 and National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 11475236.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lizhi Peng
    • 1
  • Jing Wu
    • 1
  • Fang Ding
    • 1
  • Sixiang Zhao
    • 1
  • Li Qiao
    • 2
  • Hongmin Mao
    • 1
  • Peng Wang
    • 2
  • Guang-Nan Luo
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Fusion Reactor Materials Division, Institute of Plasma PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesHefeiChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina
  3. 3.Hefei Center for Physical Science and TechnologyHefeiChina
  4. 4.Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of SciencesHefeiChina

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