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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 33, Issue 5, pp 1083–1088 | Cite as

The Influence of Tissue Handling on the Flavonoid Content of the Aquatic Plant Posidonia oceanica

  • Magali Cannac
  • Lila Ferrat
  • Toussaint Barboni
  • Gerard Pergent
  • Vanina Pasqualini
Rapid Communication

Abstract

In recent times, more and more studies have focused on flavonoids as biomarkers of environmental quality in aquatic plants, in particular, Posidonia oceanica (Linnaeus) Delile. It is therefore of interest to determine how different prehandling methods can affect flavonoid concentrations. The methods tested were (1) immediate extraction of fresh samples, (2) extraction after 48 hr chilling, (3) freeze-drying, and (4) oven drying. Chilling and freeze-drying considerably altered the quantity of flavonoids measured, but not their profile. The effect of oven drying was not significant. Chilling led to a loss of 57% of total (pro)anthocyanidins, 39% of total flavonols, and 48% of all simple flavonols (myricetin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol). Freeze-drying caused a loss of 71% of total (pro)anthocyanidins, 87% of total flavonols, and 95% of all simple flavonols.

Keywords

Prehandling methods Chilling Freeze-drying Oven-drying Posidonia oceanica Flavonoids (pro)Anthocyanidins Flavonols 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was carried out and funded in the framework of the Interreg III European Programs. The authors thank C. Lafabrie and B. Mimault for participation in field missions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magali Cannac
    • 1
  • Lila Ferrat
    • 1
  • Toussaint Barboni
    • 1
  • Gerard Pergent
    • 2
  • Vanina Pasqualini
    • 1
  1. 1.UMR CNRS 6134 Systèmes Physiques de l’EnvironnementUniversity of CorsicaCorteFrance
  2. 2.Faculty of SciencesUniversity of CorsicaCorteFrance

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