Advertisement

Acetophenone as an Anti-attractant for the Western Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus Brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

  • N. Erbilgin
  • N. E. Gillette
  • S. R. Mori
  • J. D. Stein
  • D. R. Owen
  • D. L. Wood
Rapid Communication

Abstract

Host location and colonization by bark beetles is dependent upon the relative and absolute amounts of attractant and antiattractant compounds available. Many investigations have lead to use of antiattractants for the management of these pests and have been especially focused on verbenone. However, recent studies have identified new antiattractants for several species of bark beetles. We report results of recent investigations of the response of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, to two recently identified antiattractants, acetophenone, and fenchyl alcohol, with verbenone as a standard of comparison, in northern California. Release of both acetophenone and verbenone resulted in significantly lower trap catches of D. brevicomis in aggregation pheromone-baited traps, while fenchyl alcohol was inactive. Acetophenone was the only antiattractant that did not reduce numbers of the most abundant predator of D. brevicomis, Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim), responding to the attractant pheromone of its prey. Aggregation pheromone-baited traps with acetophenone also had the highest predator/prey ratio. Our results suggest that acetophenone may be part of the intra- and interspecific interactions among sympatric species of bark beetles and may have application in their control.

Keywords

Acetophenone Verbenone Fenchyl alcohol Antiattractants Bark beetles Predators 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Jeffrey Webster (Total Forestry, Redding, CA), Fabian Uzoh (USDA Forest Service, Redding, CA), and Emmanuel Uzoh (USDA Forest Service, Redding, CA, volunteer) for valuable assistance with installation and maintenance of the study. We thank James Wolter (Hancock Forest Management) for permission to conduct this study on private lands. The authors are also thankful to three anonymous reviewers and an associate editor (Dr. Monika Hilker) for their help on the previous draft of this manuscript.

References

  1. Bertram, S. L. and Paine, T. D. 1994a. Influence of aggregation inhibitors (verbenone and ipsdienol) on landing and attack behavior of Dendroctonus brevicomis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). J. Chem. Ecol. 20:1617–1629.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bertram, S. L. and Paine, T. D. 1994b. Response of Dendroctonus brevicomis Le Conte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to different release rates and ratios of aggregation semiochemicals and the inhibitors verbenone and ipsdienol. J. Chem. Ecol. 20:2931–2941.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Borden, J. H. 1996. Disruption of semiochemicals-mediated aggregation in bark beetles, pp. 421–438, in R. T. Cardé and A. K. Minks (eds.). Pheromone Research: New Directions. Chapman & Hall, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Liang, K. Y. and Zeger, S. L. 1986. Longitudinal data analysis using generalized linear, models. Biometrika 73:13–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. McCulloch, C. E. and Searle, S. R. 2001. Generalized, Linear, and Mixed Models. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 325 pp.Google Scholar
  6. Paine, T. D. and Hanlon, C. C. 1991. Response of Dendroctonus brevicomis and Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to combinations of synthetic pheromone attractants and inhibitors verbenone and ipsdienol. J. Chem. Ecol. 17:2163–2176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Pureswaran, D. S. and Borden, J. H. 2004. New repellent semiochemicals for three species of Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Chemoecology 14:67–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Pureswaran, D. S., Gries, R., Borden, J. H., and Pierce, H. D. Jr. 2000. Dynamics of pheromone production and communication in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and the pine engraver, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Chemoecology 10:153–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Sullivan, B. T. 2005. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to volatiles isolated from conspecifics. J. Econ. Entomol. 98:2067–2078.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Wood, D. L. 1982. The role of pheromones, kairomones and allomones in the host selection and colonization behavior of bark beetles. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 27:411–446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Erbilgin
    • 1
  • N. E. Gillette
    • 2
  • S. R. Mori
    • 2
  • J. D. Stein
    • 3
  • D. R. Owen
    • 4
  • D. L. Wood
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Organisms and EnvironmentUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research StationBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise TeamMorgantownUSA
  4. 4.California Department of Forestry and Fire ProtectionReddingUSA

Personalised recommendations