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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 621–646 | Cite as

Identification Of Sex Pheromone Components Of The Painted Apple Moth: A Tussock Moth With A Thermally Labile Pheromone Component

  • A. M. El-Sayed
  • A. R. Gibb
  • D. M. Suckling
  • B. Bunn
  • S. Fielder
  • D. Comeskey
  • L. A. Manning
  • S. P. Foster
  • B. D. Morris
  • T. ando
  • K. Mori
Article

Abstract

The sex pheromone of the painted apple moth, Teia anartoides (Lymantriidae) was investigated using GC-EAD and GC-MS analysis, derivatization, TLC analysis, and field cage and field trapping bioassays. The major sex pheromone components were identified as (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-one and (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-diene. Other minor components of pheromone gland extracts included (6Z)-9R,10S-epoxyeicos-6-ene, (6Z)-9R,10S-epoxyhenicos-6-ene, (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-ol, (6Z)-henicos-6-en-11-one, and (6Z, 8E)-henicosa-6,8-dien-11-one, but the roles of these minor components remain equivocal. In field cage and field experiments, a blend of all seven identified components [(6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-one (relative amount 100), (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-diene (100), (6Z)-9R,10S-epoxyeicos-6-ene (5), (6Z)-9R,10S-epoxyhenicos-6-ene (10), (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-ol (5), (6Z)-henicos-6-en-11-one (1), and (6Z,8E)-henicosa-6,8-dien-11-one (25)] was as attractive to males as calling females, but tests with blends of the major component(s) with subsets of the minor components did not produce consistent results that unequivocally showed the various minor components to be critical components of the active blend. (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-one is thermally labile and rearranges to (6Z,8E)-henicosa-6,8-dien-11-one and other products at ambient temperature, rendering the synthetic pheromone lure inactive after two days of field exposure.

KeyWords

Pheromone tussock moth Lymantriidae Teia anartoides (6Z 9Z)-henicosa-6,9-dien-11-one (6Z,8E)-henicosa-6,8-dien-11-one (6Z)-9R 10S-epoxyhenicos-6-ene (6Z)-9R,10S-epoxyeicos-6-ene (6Z,9Z)-henicosa-6,9-diene (6Z)-henicos-6-en-11-one painted apple moth 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. El-Sayed
    • 1
  • A. R. Gibb
    • 1
  • D. M. Suckling
    • 1
  • B. Bunn
    • 2
  • S. Fielder
    • 2
  • D. Comeskey
    • 2
  • L. A. Manning
    • 1
  • S. P. Foster
    • 3
    • 6
  • B. D. Morris
    • 3
    • 6
  • T. ando
    • 4
  • K. Mori
    • 5
  1. 1.HortResearchCanterbury Research CenterNew Zealand
  2. 2.HortResearchPalmerston North Research CenterPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  3. 3.HortResearchMt. Albert Research CenterAucklandNew Zealand
  4. 4.Tokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Fuji Flavor Co., Ltd.TokyoJapan
  6. 6.Entomology DepartmentNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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