Autism Awareness Interventions for Children and Adolescents: a Scoping Review

Abstract

Research to date indicates that a significant contributing factor to the social experience in school and college for those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) relates to peers understanding of their condition and the associated social challenges. The current review sought to examine evidence for autism awareness programs designed to improve peers’ conceptions and understandings of ASD. Eleven studies were examined in relation to reported changes in aspects of autism awareness in students without ASD who had participated in an educational program or interventions about ASD. Reported interventions varied in length and delivery style. There is some emerging evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions in changing knowledge, attitudes and intentional behaviors of students without ASD. The implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed along with directions for future research.

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Fig. 1

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Cremin, K., Healy, O., Spirtos, M. et al. Autism Awareness Interventions for Children and Adolescents: a Scoping Review. J Dev Phys Disabil 33, 27–50 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10882-020-09741-1

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Keywords

  • Peers
  • Autism awareness
  • Intervention
  • Autism Spectrum disorder
  • Knowledge
  • Attitude