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Adapting the Picture Exchange Communication System to Elicit Vocalizations in Children with Autism

  • Alissa L. Greenberg
  • Melaura Erickson Tomaino
  • Marjorie H. Charlop
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between PECS training and vocalizations in children with limited verbal abilities (e.g., children who are unable to verbally imitate simple phrases). Study 1 used a multiple baseline design across children to examine the vocalizations of four children with autism during and after PECS training. At follow-up, three of the participants demonstrated higher frequencies of vocalizations than at baseline. Further, two of these participants used both PECS and vocalizations to mand at different times, but did not pair the two modalities. Study 2 was then conducted to determine if children with limited verbal abilities could be taught to pair PECS with spontaneous vocalizations using time-delay and verbal prompting procedures. By the end of Study 2, both participants made a spontaneous vocalization every time that they used PECS. Findings support the potential use of PECS as a component of a treatment package leading to verbal speech.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorders Picture Exchange Communication System Speech Time-delay 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alissa L. Greenberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Melaura Erickson Tomaino
    • 1
    • 3
  • Marjorie H. Charlop
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Behavioral and Organizational SciencesClaremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA
  2. 2.Center for Autism Spectrum DisordersNationwide Children’s Hospital Center for Autism Spectrum DisordersWestervilleUSA
  3. 3.Beacon Day SchoolLa PalmaUSA
  4. 4.Claremont McKenna CollegeClaremontUSA

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