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A Multinational Study Examining the Cross Cultural Differences in Social Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Comparison between the United Kingdom and the United States of America

  • Megan Sipes
  • Frederick Furniss
  • Johnny L. Matson
  • Megan Hattier
Original Article

Abstract

Cases of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have been reported world-wide and researchers are beginning to examine if differences occur among different countries. With social skill impairments being a main component of ASD, it is important to determine if these symptoms are consistent across cultures. The current study compared 160 children with ASD, 135 from the United States and 25 from the United Kingdom, on the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters-II (MESSY-II) which is composed of three subscales: Hostile, Adaptive/Appropriate, and Inappropriate Assertiveness/Overconfident. First, the MESSY-II was found to have excellent internal reliability for both countries. Secondly, findings indicated that significant differences only occurred on the Adaptive/Appropriate subscale with the US children having greater adaptive social skills than the UK children. However, for both groups, mean scores fell in the severe range of impairment. Importance of similarities and differences in social skills between countries are discussed.

Keywords

Autism ASD Cross-cultural Matson evaluation of social skills with youngsters MESSY Social skills 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megan Sipes
    • 1
  • Frederick Furniss
    • 2
  • Johnny L. Matson
    • 1
  • Megan Hattier
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.The Hesley Group and University of LeicesterSouth YorkshireUK

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