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Case Series of Behavioral Psychotherapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Youth with Prader-Willi Syndrome

  • Eric A. Storch
  • Omar Rahman
  • Jessica Morgan
  • Lindsay Brauer
  • Jennifer Miller
  • Tanya K. Murphy
Original Article

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive symptoms among youth with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) are frequently present and associated with considerable problems in the daily functioning of the child and his/her family. Although pharmacological and psychosocial treatments exist that target obsessive-compulsive symptoms among typically developing youth, these treatments have not been systematically adapted and/or evaluated for this population. Furthermore, although psychotropic medications have shown promising support in addressing obsessive-compulsive symptoms in several case reports involving youth with PWS, associated efficacy is modest and potential for side effects is a realistic concern. Given efficacy and tolerability of cognitive-behavioral treatment for obsessive-compulsive symptoms in typically developing youth, an adapted version of this approach may hold promise in treating clinically problematic obsessive-compulsive symptoms in youth with PWS. Thus, we report on a case series of behavioral treatment for obsessive-compulsive symptoms in three youth with PWS. Diagnostic and symptom severity assessments were conducted at screening, pre-treatment, and post-treatment by a trained independent evaluator. All youth were considered treatment responders and exhibited meaningful reductions in compulsion severity, overall obsessive-compulsive severity, and obsessive-compulsive related impairment. These data provide preliminary evidence for the utility of behavioral therapy in treating obsessive-compulsive symptoms in youth with PWS.

Keywords

Prader Willi syndrome Obsessive-compulsive disorder Cognitive-behavioral therapy Treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric A. Storch
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Omar Rahman
    • 1
  • Jessica Morgan
    • 1
  • Lindsay Brauer
    • 3
  • Jennifer Miller
    • 4
  • Tanya K. Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of South FloridaSt. PetersburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of South FloridaSt. TampaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South FloridaSt. TampaUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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