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Use of a Braille Exchange Communication System to Improve Articulation and Acquire Mands with a Legally Blind and Developmentally Disabled Female

  • Amy S. Finkel
  • Kimberly P. Weber
  • K. Mark Derby
Article

Abstract

This research examined the effectiveness of a Braille Exchange Communication System (BECS) on a legally blind adult with developmental disabilities to determine the effects on word articulation and acquisition of mands. The procedures used a multiple baseline design across four sets of words in a three-phase experiment. Phase one measured word articulation. Phase two measured acquisition of vocal mands. Phase three analyzed the exchange for communication component. Results for phases one and two showed that with verbal prompts and fading procedures, verbal responding increased dramatically. For phase three, using BECS was effective in improving communication exchanges through the use of physical prompting with fading procedures. An additional unique feature of having a third person score IOA data was included to ensure vocal response integrity.

blindness verbal behavior language acquisition developmental disabilities communication skills visual impairments 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy S. Finkel
    • 1
  • Kimberly P. Weber
    • 1
  • K. Mark Derby
    • 1
  1. 1.Gonzaga UniversitySpokane

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