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Parental Locus of Control and Family Functioning in the Quality of Life of Children with Sickle Cell Disease

  • Lamia P. Barakat
  • Meredith J. Lutz
  • D. Colette Nicolaou
  • Laurie A. Lash
Article

Abstract

The objective was to examine the association of parental locus of control (PLOC) with pediatric quality of life (QOL) for children with sickle cell disease (SCD), specifically addressing the potential mediating role of family functioning. Associations with disease severity were also investigated. Thirty-one primary caregivers completed standard measures of parental locus of control, family functioning, and quality of life during their child's inpatient admission for pain or fever. Results indicated that the PLOC total score was significantly associated with QOL in terms of self-competence and showed marginal significance with QOL social competence; it was significantly negatively correlated with family functioning. The association of the PLOC with QOL subscales was maintained when controlling for family functioning. Disease severity was not associated with PLOC scores. Primary caregivers endorsed more external parental locus of control beliefs. Further investigation of the association of caregiver appraisals and family functioning is warranted with the goal of addressing the stress that disease management with sickle cell may add to parent–child relationships.

Key Words

parental locus of control family functioning quality of life pediatric sickle cell disease 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lamia P. Barakat
    • 1
  • Meredith J. Lutz
    • 1
  • D. Colette Nicolaou
    • 1
  • Laurie A. Lash
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphia

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