Advertisement

Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 167–176 | Cite as

Client and Therapist Views About Intensive and Standard Motivational Interviewing

  • Douglas L. Polcin
  • Jennifer Sterling
  • Thomas Brown
  • Michelle Brown
  • Raymond Buscemi
  • Rachael Korcha
Original Paper

Abstract

Although motivational interviewing (MI) is a widely used intervention for alcohol and drug problems, little is known about client and therapist experiences. Client and therapist views could help better understand how MI works and what factors are important. This paper investigates experiences of clients and therapists who participated in a study that examined a standard single session of MI (MI 1) and a more intensive 9-session model (MI 9) for methamphetamine dependence. Qualitative methods included open ended questions presented to 184 clients at 2-month follow-up and 189 clients at 6-month follow-up. In addition, a focus group consisting of two therapists who delivered the interventions and two adherence monitors who listened to audiotape recordings of sessions was conducted. Clients in both conditions felt supportive, nonjudgmental therapist attitudes were helpful. Most clients in the MI 9 condition but few receiving MI 1 volunteered that feedback and advice were helpful. A strong majority in both conditions desired more sessions. Expert panel members emphasized: (1) multiple benefits of a nonjudgmental stance, (2) finding the right balance among different MI interventions, and (3) understanding the interaction of supportive and directive interventions. Panel members also emphasized that one advantages of MI 9 over MI 1 was that it enabled client change plans to be implemented over time.

Keywords

Motivational interviewing Psychotherapy Methamphetamine Client views Therapist views 

References

  1. Carroll, K. M., Ball, S. A., Nich, C., Martino, S., Frankforter, T. L., Farentinos, C., et al. (2006). Motivational interviewing to improve treatment engagement and outcome in individuals seeking treatment for substance abuse: A multisite effectiveness study. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 81(3), 301–312.PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Galloway, G. P., Polcin, D. L., Kielstein, A., Brown, M., & Mendelson, J. (2007). High dose motivational enhancement therapy for methamphetamine dependence. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, SARC Supplement, 4, 393–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hettema, J., Steele, J., & Miller, W. R. (2005). Motivational interviewing. Annual Reviw of Clinical Psychology, 1, 91–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Korcha, R. A., Polcin, D. L., Evans, K., Bond, J. C., & Galloway, G. P. (2014). Intensive motivational interviewing for women with concurrent alcohol problems and methamphetamine dependence. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46, 113–119.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Lundahl, B., & Burke, B. L. (2009). The effectiveness and applicability of motivational interviewing: a practice-friendly review of four meta-analyses. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65(11), 1232–1245.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Miller, W. R., & Rollnick, S. (2002). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people for change. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  7. Miller, W. R., & Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational interviewing: Helping people change. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  8. Morgenstern, J., & McKay, J. R. (2007). Rethinking the paradigms that inform behavioral treatment research for substance use disorders. Addiction, 102, 1377–1389.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Moyers, T. B., Miller, W. R., & Hendrickson, S. M. (2005). How does motivational interviewing work? Therapist interpersonal skill predicts client involvement within motivational interviewing sessions. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 73(4), 590–598.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Orford, J. (2008). Asking the right questions in the right way: the need for a shift in research on psychological treatments for addiction. Addiction, 103(6), 875–885.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Orford, J., Hodgson, R., Copello, A., Wilton, S., & Slegg, G. (2009). To what factors do clients attribute change? Content analysis of follow-up interviews with clients of the UK alcohol treatment trial. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 36(1), 49–58.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Polcin, D. L., Bond, J., Korcha, R., Nayak, M., Galloway, G. P., & Evans, K. (2014). Randomized trial of intensive motivational interviewing for methamphetamine dependence. Journal of Addictive Diseases. doi: 10.1080/10550887.2014.950029.
  13. Polcin, D. L., Galloway, G. P., Palmer, J., & Mains, W. (2004). The case for high-dose motivational enhancement therapy. Substance Use and Misuse, 39(2), 331–343.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. White, M. (2007). MAPS of Narrative Practice. New York: Norton & Co.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas L. Polcin
    • 1
  • Jennifer Sterling
    • 2
  • Thomas Brown
    • 3
  • Michelle Brown
    • 4
  • Raymond Buscemi
    • 3
  • Rachael Korcha
    • 1
  1. 1.Alcohol Research GroupPublic Health InstituteEmeryvilleUSA
  2. 2.Private PracticeBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.Private PracticeSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.New Leaf Treatment CenterLafayetteUSA

Personalised recommendations