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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 43, Issue 1, pp 53–62 | Cite as

Psychotherapy Integration: Using a Diversity-Sensitive Developmental Model in the Initial Interview

  • Carlos P. Zalaquett
  • S. J. Chatters
  • A. E. Ivey
Original Paper
  • 1.1k Downloads

Abstract

The diversity-sensitive developmental model of psychotherapy integrates developmental theory, the empathic relationship-story and strengths-goals-restory-action model of the interview session, and the microskills hierarchy to better serve diverse clients. The model’s procedures for interviewing diverse clients, assessing clients’ communication style, and initiating psychotherapy in a culturally sensitive setting are introduced. The specific stages of the interview model and tips are provided to aid in its application in the initial interview. Sample questions and applicable microskills to help clients rooted in specific cognitive emotional styles and improve the interviewing process at each stage are presented. These are complemented with a review of methods to eliminate developmental blocks and suggestions to integrate sensitivity to cultural differences into the clinical setting, the initial interview, and the psychotherapeutic process. The application of this model is illustrated with a case study of an initial session with a Trinidadian–American female client.

Keywords

Psychotherapy integration Developmental counseling and therapy Diversity Microskills Interview 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos P. Zalaquett
    • 1
  • S. J. Chatters
    • 1
  • A. E. Ivey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychological and Social FoundationsUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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