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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 360–362 | Cite as

Spondylodiscitis in a Boy with X-linked Agammaglobulinemia: an Unusual Occurrence

  • Sagar Bhattad
  • Pandiarajan Vignesh
  • Amit Rawat
  • Deepti Suri
  • Anju Gupta
  • Sameer Vyas
  • Surjit Singh
Letter to Editor

To the editor,

Children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) have a profound defect in B-lymphocyte development due to a mutation in BTK gene located on X chromosome. This results in severe hypogammaglobulinemia and an absence of circulating B cells. These children also have small to absent tonsils, and no palpable lymph nodes despite recurrent infections [1]. Infections include sinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, or, less often, sepsis or meningitis. Peripheral arthritis is a well-described manifestation of XLA [2]. Mycoplasma is an important etiological agent causing infective arthritis in children with XLA [3]. Vertebral infections have seldom been described in XLA. We report a young boy who presented with fever, stiff-back and an unusual gait. A detailed history, clinical examination and investigations revealed a totally unexpected diagnosis of X-linked agammaglobulinemia with an unusual manifestation of spondylodiscitis.

A two year-old boy presented with fever up to 103 °F for a...

Keywords

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Chronic Granulomatous Disease Pyoderma Index Child Vertebral Osteomyelitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

Written informed consent was taken from parents of child.

Study approved by Departmental Review Board.

Source of funding

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sagar Bhattad
    • 1
  • Pandiarajan Vignesh
    • 1
  • Amit Rawat
    • 1
  • Deepti Suri
    • 1
  • Anju Gupta
    • 1
  • Sameer Vyas
    • 2
  • Surjit Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Paediatric Allergy & Immunology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Advanced Paediatrics CentrePostgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER)ChandigarhIndia
  2. 2.Department of RadiodiagnosisPost Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER)ChandigarhIndia

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