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Journal of Oceanography

, Volume 65, Issue 1, pp 113–120 | Cite as

Upwelling of oxygen-depleted water (Sumishio) in Omura Bay, Japan

  • Tetsuya Takahashi
  • Hideaki Nakata
  • Keiji Hirano
  • Kazumi Matsuoka
  • Mitsunori Iwataki
  • Hitoshi Yamaguchi
  • Tomoyuki Kasuya
Original Articles

Abstract

Wind-induced circulation and the distribution of hypoxia corresponding to the upwelling of oxygen-depleted water (called “Aoshio” in Japan and “Sumishio” locally in Omura Bay) in Omura Bay, Japan, was examined field observations and by three-dimensional modeling. During the calm weather in summer, well-mixed strait water, in rich oxygen at the mouth of the bay intruded into the middle layer of the bay, southward and northward along the west and east coast, respectively, forming basin-scale cyclonic circulation. A stagnant water mass was formed below the center of this cyclonic circulation, and it became hypoxic water. As a result of the prevailing strong southeast (northeast) wind, the bottom hypoxia moved in a southeasterly (northeasterly) direction. This induces the upwelling of hypoxic water, accompanied by mass mortality of marine organisms.

Keywords

Wind cyclonic circulation oxygen-depleted water Omura Bay 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuya Takahashi
    • 1
  • Hideaki Nakata
    • 2
  • Keiji Hirano
    • 3
  • Kazumi Matsuoka
    • 1
  • Mitsunori Iwataki
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Yamaguchi
    • 4
  • Tomoyuki Kasuya
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute for East China Sea ResearchNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of FisheriesNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  3. 3.Nagasaki Prefectural Institute of FisheriesNagasakiJapan
  4. 4.Nagasaki Prefectural Institute for Environmental Research and Public HealthNagasakiJapan

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