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Journal of Chemical Crystallography

, Volume 40, Issue 9, pp 769–777 | Cite as

Synthesis and Crystal Structure of MnII(OAc)2[15-MC Mn III (N)shi-5](Im)3(EtOH)3 (shi3− = salicylhydroximate, OAc = acetate, Im = imidazole, and EtOH = ethanol)

  • Brian Emerich
  • Matthew Smith
  • Matthias Zeller
  • Curtis M. Zaleski
Original Paper

Abstract

The metallacrown complex MnII(OAc)2[15-MC Mn III (N)shi-5](Im)3(EtOH)3 has been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with a = 24.3326(15) Å, b = 24.0354(15) Å, c = 27.0531(17) Å, α = 90.00°, β = 100.3883(11)°, γ = 90.00°, V = 15562.5(17) Å3, Z = 4, and Z′ = 2. Four of the five manganese(III) ions of the metallacrown ring adopt a distorted octahedral coordination geometry, and the fifth manganese(III) ion is five coordinate and exhibits a distorted square pyramidal environment. The configuration of the manganese(III) ions about the ring follows a pattern of ΔΛΔPP, with P representing planar. In addition, the imidazole units are bound to three separate ring manganese(III) ions, and the imidazole units are directed to the outside of the molecule. A manganese(II) ion is encapsulated in the central core of the molecule, and the central ion is seven coordinate with a face-capped trigonal prismatic geometry.

Index Abstract

The metallacrown complex MnII(OAc)2[15-MC Mn III (N)shi-5](Im)3(EtOH)3 was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

Keywords

Metallacrown Manganese Coordination complex 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded by The Shippensburg University Foundation UG 2430-05 and 2367-057 to C.M.Z, and the diffractometer was funded by NSF grant 0087210, by Ohio Board of Regents grant CAP-491, and by YSU. The authors thank Dr. Daniel P. Predecki of Shippensburg University for his useful discussions.

Supplementary material

10870_2010_9735_MOESM1_ESM.doc (2.1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 2114 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Emerich
    • 1
  • Matthew Smith
    • 1
  • Matthias Zeller
    • 2
  • Curtis M. Zaleski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryShippensburg UniversityShippensburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryYoungstown State UniversityYoungstownUSA

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