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Journal of Chemical Crystallography

, Volume 38, Issue 10, pp 765–768 | Cite as

Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a Novel Self-assembled 2D Coordination Polymer of Chloridobis(imidazolidine-2-thione)thiocyanato dicopper(I)

  • Fouzia Noreen
  • Tobias Rüffer
  • Heinrich Lang
  • Anvarhusein A. Isab
  • Saeed Ahmad
Original Paper

Abstract

A copper(I) complex, poly(chloridobis(imidazolidine-2-thione)thiocyanato dicopper(I)), [Cu2(Imt)2(SCN)Cl] n (1) (Imt = Imidazolidine-2-thione) has been prepared by the reaction of CuCl2 with imidazolidine-2-thione and potassium thiocyanate in the ratio of 1:1:2. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/a in the form of a coordination polymer, consisting of 2D layers. The solid-state structure is composed of dinuclear units having each copper(I) ion tetrahedrally coordinated. These units aggregate through bridging Imt and thiocyanate leading to a supramolecular 2D-network.

Index Abstract

The title complex, poly(chloridobis(imidazolidine-2-thione)thiocyanato dicopper(I)), [Cu2(Imt)2(SCN)Cl] n (Imt = Imidazolidine-2-thione) was prepared by the reaction of CuCl2 with imidazolidine-2-thione and potassium thiocyanate in the ratio of 1:1:2. The crystal structure consists of dinuclear units having each copper(I) ion tetrahedrally coordinated. These units aggregate through bridging Imt and thiocyanate leading to a supramolecular 2D-network.

Keywords

Copper(I) Imidazolidine-2-thione Thiocyanate Crystal structure 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Financial support from the UET Research Center and Pakistan Council for Science and Technology Islamabad, Pakistan, and from KFUPM Research Committee, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fouzia Noreen
    • 1
  • Tobias Rüffer
    • 2
  • Heinrich Lang
    • 2
  • Anvarhusein A. Isab
    • 3
  • Saeed Ahmad
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Engineering and TechnologyLahorePakistan
  2. 2.Lehrstuhl fur Anorganische Chemie, Institut fur ChemieTechnische Universitat ChemnitzChemnitzGermany
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryKing Fahd University of Petroleum and MineralsDhahranSaudi Arabia

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