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Journal of Business and Psychology

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 65–78 | Cite as

The Effect of Induced Positive and Negative Emotion and Openness-to-Feeling in Student’s Consumer Decision Making

  • Shih-Chieh Chuang
  • Hung-Ming Lin
Article

Abstract

How do emotional states affect risk-taking and consumer decisions? Serial experiments were conducted to demonstrate and explain the relationships among emotions, risk-taking, and consumer decisions. Study 1 showed that participants whose emotional condition was negative were more likely to systematically engage in risk-taking behavior than those exhibiting positive emotions, and the emotional effects were moderated by openness to feeling (OF) as a function of individual personality. Studies 2–5 were mainly to examine the effects of emotional conditions on consumer decision. The results of studies 2–5 substantiated our prediction that participants in positive emotional states were less likely to respond to puffer advertising and sales promotion, thus increasing the share of an option that is “average” in all dimensions, and more likely to have a compromise effect than in those in a negative emotional condition. Studies 2–5 also found that the emotional effects were moderated by individuals’ openness to their own feelings. The effects are discussed in relation to the literature on emotions, risk-taking, and consumer decisions.

Keywords

Emotion Risk-taking Openness-to-feeling Consumer decision 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors like to thank George A. Neuman as well as the anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business, LCC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Business AdministrationNational Chung Cheng UniversityMin-Hsiung, Chia-YiTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Business AdministrationMing Hsin University of Science and TechnologyHsinchuTaiwan

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