Effects of Group Behavioral Skills Training on Teacher Candidates’ Acquisition and Maintenance of Active Listening

Abstract

This study examined group-delivered behavioral skills training (BST) as a method for preparing special education teacher candidates to demonstrate active listening communication skills. Results indicated that: (a) BST was effective for instruction, (b) all instructional groups maintained communication skills across probes, and (c) participants felt prepared to talk to general education teachers and parents after BST in communication skills. Results offer evidence that BST can be implemented in group settings and can be used to teach communication skills to teacher candidates. Teacher preparers should consider BST as a method for communication skills training in university classrooms as a way to support preservice teachers.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

References

  1. Ammentorp, L., & Madden, L. (2018). Learning from others: Developing preservice teachers’ workplace skills. The Educational Forum, 82(1), 85–96. https://doi.org/10.1080/00131725.2018.1385274.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Beaulieu, L., Hanley, G. P., & Santiago, J. L. (2014). Improving the conversation skills of a college student with peer-mediated behavioral skills training. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 30, 48–53. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40616-013-0001-8.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. Benedict, A., Holdheide, L., Brownell, M., & Foley, A. M. (2016). Learning to teach: Practice-based preparation in teacher education. Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability, and Reform (CEEDAR) Center. Retrieved December 15, 2020 from https://gtlcenter.org/products-resources/learning-teach-practice-based-preparation-education.

  4. Beneke, M., & Cheatham, G. (2016). Inclusive, democratic family-professional partnerships: (Re)conceptualizing culture and language in teacher preparation. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 35(4), 243–244.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Bodie, G. D., & St. CyrPenceRoldHoneycutt, K. M. M. J. (2012). Listening competence in initial interactions: Distinguishing between what listening is and what listeners do. International Journal of Listening, 26, 1–28. https://doi.org/10.1080/10904018.2012.639645.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Brock, M. E., Cannella-Malone, H. I., Seaman, R. L., Andzik, N. R., Schaefer, J. M., Page, E. J., et al. (2017). Findings across practitioner training studies in special education: A comprehensive review and meta-analysis. Exceptional Children, 84(1), 7–26. https://doi.org/10.1177/0014402917698008.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Cleland, J. A., Abe, K., & Rethans, J. J. (2009). The use of simulated patients in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 42. Medical Teacher, 31, 477–486. https://doi.org/10.1080/01421590903002821.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  8. Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (2020). Applied behavior analysis (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill-Prentice Hall.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Dettmer, P., Thurston, L. P., Knackendoffel, A., & Dyck, N. J. (2008). Collaboration, consultation, and teamwork for students with special needs. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Erath, T. G., DiGennaro Reed, F. D., Sundermeyer, H. W., Brand, D., Novak, M. D., Harbison, M. J., & Shears, R. (2020). Enhancing the training integrity of human service staff using pyramidal behavioral skills training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 53, 449–464. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaba.608.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  11. Erchul, W. P., Sheridan, S. M., Ryan, D. A., Grissom, P. F., Killough, C. E., & Mettler, D. W. (1999). Patterns of relational communication in conjoint behavioral consultation. School Psychology Quarterly, 14, 121–147. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0089001.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Fontes, L. (2009). Interviewing clients across cultures: A practitioner’s guide. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Hunt, S., Simonds, C., & Cooper, P. (2002). Communication and teacher education: Exploring a communication course for all teachers. Communication Education, 51, 81–94. https://doi.org/10.1080/03634520216497.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Kirkpatrick, M., Akers, J., & Rivera, G. (2019). Use of behavioral skills training with teachers: A systematic review. Journal of Behavioral Education, 28, 344–361. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-019-09322-z.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Kratochwill, T. R., Hitchcock, J., Horner, R. H., Levin, J. R., Odom, S. L., Rindskopf, D. M., & Shadish, W. R. (2010). Single-case designs technical documentation. Retrieved January 20, 2021 from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED510743.pdf.

  16. Kroth, R. L., Edge, D., & Kroth, R. L. (1997). Strategies for communicating with parents and families of exceptional children. Denver: Love Pub. Co.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Ledford, J. R., Lane, J. D., & Gast, D. L. (2018). Dependent variables, measurement, and reliability. In J. R. Ledford & D. L. Gast (Eds.), Single case research methodology: Applications in special education and behavioral sciences (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  18. McLeskey, J., Barringer, M.-D., Billingsley, B., Brownell, M., Jackson, D., Kennedy, M., et al. (2017). High-leverage practices in special education. Arlington, VA: Council for Exceptional Children & CEEDAR Center.

    Google Scholar 

  19. McNaughton, D., Hamlin, D., McCarthy, J., Head-Reeves, D., & Schreiner, M. (2008). Learning to listen: Teaching an active listening strategy to preservice education professionals. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 27, 223–231. https://doi.org/10.1177/0271121407311241.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. McNaughton, D., & Vostal, B. R. (2010). Using active listening to improve collaboration with parents. Intervention in School and Clinic, 45, 251–256. https://doi.org/10.1177/1053451209353443.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Miltenberger, R. G. (2012). Behavior modification: Principles and procedures. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Parsons, M. B., Rollyson, J. H., & Reid, D. H. (2012). Evidence-based staff training: A guide for practitioners. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5(2), 2–11. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03391819.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  23. Risko, V., & Bromley, K. (2001). Collaboration for diverse learners: Viewpoints and practices. Florence, KY: Psychology Press.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Rupiper, M., & Marvin, C. (2004). Preparing teachers for family centered services: A survey of preservice curriculum content. Teacher Education and Special Education, 27(4), 384–395.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Saldaña, J. (2016). The coding manual for qualitative researchers. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Sawyer, M. R., Andzik, N. R., Kranak, M. P., Willke, C. P., Curiel, E. S. L., Hensley, L. E., et al. (2017). Improving pre-service teachers’ perfromance through skills behavioral skills training. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10(3), 296–300. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-017-0198-4.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  27. Shayne, R., & Miltenberger, R. G. (2013). Evaluation of behavioral skills training for teaching functional assessment and treatment selection skills to parents. Behavioral Interventions, 28, 4–21. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1350.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Spataro, S. E., & Bloch, J. (2018). “Can you repeat that?” Teaching active listening in management education. Journal of Management Education, 42, 168–198. https://doi.org/10.1177/1052562917748696.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Stocco, C. S., Thompson, R. H., Hart, J. M., & Soriano, H. L. (2017). Improving the interview skills of college students using behavioral skills training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 495–510. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaba.385.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  30. Thistle, J. J., & McNaughton, D. (2015). Teaching active listening skills to pre-service speech-language pathologists: A first step in supporting collaboration with parents of young children who require AAC. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 46, 44–55.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Vostal, B. R., McNaughton, D., Benedek-Wood, E., & Hoffman, K. (2015). Preparing teachers for collaborative communication: Evaluation in instruction in an active listening strategy. National Teacher Education Journal, 8(2), 5–14.

    Google Scholar 

  32. Weiss, M., Pellegrino, A., & Brigham, F. (2017). Practicing collaboration in teacher preparation: Effects of learning by doing together. Teacher Education and Special Education, 40(1), 65–76. https://doi.org/10.1177/0888406416655457.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Weger, H., Castle, G. R., & Emmett, M. C. (2010). Active listening in peer interviews: The influence of message paraphrasing on perceptions of listening skill. International Journal of Listening, 24, 34–49. https://doi.org/10.1080/10904010903466311.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  34. What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. (2017). What Works Clearinghouse: Standards handbook (version 4.0). Retrieved November 7, 2019 from http://whatworks.ed.gov.

  35. Wirantana, V., Stocco, C. S., & Kohn, C. S. (2020). The implementation and adoptability of behavioral skills training in a university career center. Behavioral Interventions, 35(1), 84–98. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1692.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Brooks R. Vostal.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declared that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval and Informed consent

This study was approved by the university Institutional Review Board (IRB) and all participants provided informed consent.

Additional information

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Vostal, B.R., Mrachko, A.A., Vostal, M. et al. Effects of Group Behavioral Skills Training on Teacher Candidates’ Acquisition and Maintenance of Active Listening. J Behav Educ (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-021-09431-8

Download citation

Keywords

  • Behavioral skills training
  • Teacher candidates
  • Active listening
  • Communication skills
  • Multiple probes across participants design