Establishing Requesting with Children Diagnosed with Autism Using Embedded Instruction in the Context of Academic Activities

Abstract

Embedded instruction offers a potentially effective, non-disruptive, and socially acceptable intervention approach for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in general education settings. However, the literature using embedded instruction has not frequently provided data on embedded instruction targets and targets within the ongoing lessons or maintenance of the acquired skills. This study evaluated the effectiveness of embedded instruction to teach three individuals diagnosed with ASD communication skills during the course of existing lessons. Data were collected on embedded instruction targets, academic targets (i.e., targets within existing lessons), and maintenance of mastered targets. The results of a non-concurrent multiple baseline design indicated embedded instruction was effective for all three participants and the acquired skills maintained. The results are discussed with respect to future research and clinical application of the methods evaluated.

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Correspondence to Joseph H. Cihon.

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Cheung, Y., Lai, C.O.Y., Cihon, J.H. et al. Establishing Requesting with Children Diagnosed with Autism Using Embedded Instruction in the Context of Academic Activities. J Behav Educ (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-020-09397-z

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Keywords

  • Embedded instruction
  • Communication
  • Autism
  • Discrete trial teaching