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A Pilot Trial of Supporting teens’ Academic Needs Daily (STAND): A Parent-Adolescent Collaborative Intervention for ADHD

  • Margaret H. Sibley
  • William E. PelhamJr.
  • Karen J. Derefinko
  • Aparajita B. Kuriyan
  • Frances Sanchez
  • Paulo A. Graziano
Article

Abstract

Behavior therapy is one of two evidence-based treatments for ADHD—the other being stimulant medication. However, there are only a handful of studies of behavioral treatment for ADHD in adolescents (Smith et al. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review 3:243–267, 2000). Supporting Teens’ Academic Needs Daily (STAND) is a parent-adolescent collaborative behavioral intervention for adolescents with ADHD that can be delivered in clinic, school, and community settings. This pilot study evaluates the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of STAND. Thirty-six male and female middle school students with ADHD and diverse ethnic backgrounds were randomly assigned to STAND or a Treatment as Usual (TAU) control group. Participants were evaluated at baseline, mid-treatment, and post-treatment assessments. Results suggest that STAND can be implemented by even beginner therapists with high treatment fidelity and is accessible to and popular with families. Relative to the TAU group, participants who received STAND showed greater improvements in parent-rated and observed academic and symptom indices. Treatment effects were not present for teacher ratings. Although the STAND group made significant gains in GPA (compared to TAU), these gains were small in size (d = .25). The future of STAND as an academic intervention for adolescents with ADHD is discussed, as well as general implications for behavioral treatment delivery to ADHD adolescents.

Keywords

ADHD Adolescents Behavioral treatment Families 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret H. Sibley
    • 1
  • William E. PelhamJr.
    • 1
  • Karen J. Derefinko
    • 2
  • Aparajita B. Kuriyan
    • 1
  • Frances Sanchez
    • 3
  • Paulo A. Graziano
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Children and FamiliesFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA
  2. 2.University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  3. 3.Nova Southeastern UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA

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