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Experimental study on the construction of small three-dimensional tissue engineered grafts of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone

  • Guang-Chang Zhu
  • Yong-Quan Gu
  • Xue Geng
  • Zeng-Guo Feng
  • Shu-Wen Zhang
  • Lin Ye
  • Zhong-Gao Wang
Engineering and Nano-engineering Approaches for Medical Devices
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Engineering and Nano-engineering Approaches for Medical Devices

Abstract

Studies on three-dimensional tissue engineered graft (3DTEG) have attracted great interest among researchers as they present a means to meet the pressing clinical demand for tissue engineering scaffolds. To explore the feasibility of 3DTEG, high porosity poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was obtained via the co-electrospinning of polyethylene glycol and PCL, and used to construct small-diameter poly-ε-caprolactone–lysine (PCL–LYS–H) scaffolds, whereby heparin was anchored to the scaffold surface by lysine groups. A variety of small-diameter 3DTEG models were constructed with different PCL layers and the mechanical properties of the resulting constructs were evaluated in order to select the best model for 3DTEGs. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were induced and differentiated to endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). A 3DTEG (labeled ‘10-4 %’) was successfully produced by the dynamic co-culture of ECs on the PCL–LYS–H scaffolds and SMCs on PCL. The fluorescently labeled cells on the 3DTEG were subsequently observed by laser confocal microscopy, which showed that the ECs and SMCs were embedded in the 3DTEG. Nitric oxide and endothelial nitric oxide synthase assays showed that the ECs behaved normally in the 3DTEG. This study consequently provides a new thread to produce small-diameter tissue engineered grafts, with excellent mechanical properties, that are perfusable to vasculature and functional cells.

Keywords

Nitric Oxide Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid Activate Partial Thromboplastin Time eNOS Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (2011AA020507). We declare no bias toward any institute who supported this study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no potential conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guang-Chang Zhu
    • 1
  • Yong-Quan Gu
    • 1
  • Xue Geng
    • 2
  • Zeng-Guo Feng
    • 2
  • Shu-Wen Zhang
    • 1
  • Lin Ye
    • 2
  • Zhong-Gao Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Vascular Surgery, Xuanwu HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of Materials Science & EngineeringBeijing Institute of TechnologyBeijingChina

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