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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 50, Issue 21, pp 7048–7057 | Cite as

Characterization of clay composite ballistic witness materials

Time-, temperature-, and history-dependent properties
  • Jonathan E. Seppala
  • Yoonae Heo
  • Paul E. Stutzman
  • John R. Sieber
  • Chad R. Snyder
  • Kirk D. Rice
  • Gale A. Holmes
Original Paper

Abstract

Mechanical and thermal properties of Roma Plastilina Clay #1 (RP1) were studied through small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS), large-amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), supplemented with thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray florescence. Rheological characterizations of RP1 through SAOS indicate that the clay composite softens as it is worked and slowly stiffens as it rests. Upon heating, the clay composite softens, prior work history is erased, and the composite undergoes a melting transition, although melted clay is significantly stiffer when returned to the usage temperature. Continuing mechanical characterizations into the LAOS or nonlinear region, RP1 transitions from a transient network to a viscous shear-thinning material as the temperature is increased. Using the MITlaos framework, RP1 exhibits intra-cycle strain stiffening and intra-cycle shear thinning at all temperatures.

Keywords

Differential Scanning Calorimetry Storage Modulus Thermal Gravimetric Analysis Strain Sweep Material Safety Data Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to S. Leigh, A. Kotula, and A. Forster for reviewing this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan E. Seppala
    • 1
  • Yoonae Heo
    • 2
  • Paul E. Stutzman
    • 3
  • John R. Sieber
    • 4
  • Chad R. Snyder
    • 1
  • Kirk D. Rice
    • 5
  • Gale A. Holmes
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Science and Engineering DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.Montgomery CollegeGaithersburgUSA
  3. 3.Materials and Structural Systems DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  4. 4.Chemical Sciences DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  5. 5.Materials Measurement Science DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA

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