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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 48, Issue 15, pp 5361–5372 | Cite as

Springback and anelasticity of mg alloys measured in three-point bending

  • A. Munitz
  • M. J. Kaufman
Article

Abstract

The springback and anelastic behavior of selected Mg alloys were investigated as a function of thermo-mechanical state and loading conditions by strain-recovery experiments in three-point bending. The observed stress relaxations were primarily due to recoverable microstructural relaxations and the transformation of linear-elastic strains to recoverable time-dependent anelastic strains. This transformation occurs by thermally activated dislocation motion or reversible twin movement and influences the magnitude of the springback effect. The amount of anelastic strain observed during stress relaxation experiments was found to depend on four factors: initial dislocation density (cold work), applied strain levels, temperature, and holding time at fixed strain levels.

Keywords

Stress Relaxation Cold Rolling Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer Residual Strain Applied Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nuclear Research Center-NegevBeershebaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Metallurgical and Materials EngineeringColorado School of MinesGoldenUSA

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