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Structural characteristics and high-temperature oxidation behavior of porous Fe–40 at.%Al alloy

  • P. Z. Shen
  • M. Song
  • H. Y. Gao
  • Y. H. He
  • J. Zou
  • N. P. Xu
  • B. Y. Huang
  • C. T. Liu
Article

Abstract

Porous FeAl alloy was prepared by Fe and Al elemental reaction synthesis. The cyclic oxidation evolutions of porous Fe–40 at.%Al alloy at the elevated temperatures of 600 and 800 °C in air were studied and compared to porous materials of Ti, Ni, and 316L stainless steel. It has been shown that the oxidation of porous Fe–40 at.%Al alloy fitted a power law and no spallation was found after cyclic oxidation for 202 h in air. The porous FeAl alloy exhibits much better oxidation resistance than other porous materials, such as Ti, Ni, and 316L stainless steel, indicating that the porous Fe–40 at.%Al alloy has the highest structural stability at the elevated temperature in the oxidation atmosphere. Thus, the porous FeAl alloy can be used as filtering materials at elevated temperature in the oxidation atmosphere.

Keywords

Porous Material High Temperature Oxidation 316L Stainless Steel Oxidation Time Cyclic Oxidation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was performed under the auspices of National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2009CB623400), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.20476106 and No.20636020), National Natural Science Founds for Distinguished Young Scholar (No.50825102) and the 111 Project of Chinese Ministry of Education.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Powder MetallurgyCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.School of Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and MicroanalysisThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Nanjing University of TechnologyNanjingChina
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina

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