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Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing

, Volume 22, Issue 6, pp 965–978 | Cite as

A simulated annealing algorithm approach to hybrid flow shop scheduling with sequence-dependent setup times

  • H. S. Mirsanei
  • M. Zandieh
  • M. J. Moayed
  • M. R. Khabbazi
Article

Abstract

One of the scheduling problems with various applications in industries is hybrid flow shop. In hybrid flow shop, a series of n jobs are processed at a series of g workshops with several parallel machines in each workshop. To simplify the model construction in most research on hybrid flow shop scheduling problems, the setup times of operations have been ignored, combined with their corresponding processing times, or considered non sequence-dependent. However, in most real industries such as chemical, textile, metallurgical, printed circuit board, and automobile manufacturing, hybrid flow shop problems have sequence-dependent setup times (SDST). In this research, the problem of SDST hybrid flow shop scheduling with parallel identical machines to minimize the makespan is studied. A novel simulated annealing (NSA) algorithm is developed to produce a reasonable manufacturing schedule within an acceptable computational time. In this study, the proposed NSA uses a well combination of two moving operators for generating new solutions. The obtained results are compared with those computed by Random Key Genetic Algorithm (RKGA) and Immune Algorithm (IA) which are proposed previously. The results show that NSA outperforms both RKGA and IA.

Keywords

Scheduling Hybrid flow shop Sequence-dependent setup times Makespan Meta-heuristic Simulated annealing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. S. Mirsanei
    • 1
  • M. Zandieh
    • 2
  • M. J. Moayed
    • 3
  • M. R. Khabbazi
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Industrial EngineeringMazandaran University of Science and TechnologyBabolIran
  2. 2.Department of Industrial Management, Management and Accounting FacultyShahid Beheshti UniversityTehranIran
  3. 3.Department of Computer Science and Information TechnologyUniversity Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringUniversity Putra MalaysiaSerdangMalaysia

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